Iowa scientists sit on advisory panel for NASA’s satellite missions

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Iowa scientists sit on advisory panel for NASA’s satellite missions

Academic professionals at the University of Iowa and Iowa State University are assisting NASA in deciding what satellites should stay in orbit. According to Iowa State University, Brian Hornbuckle, a professor of agronomy at ISU, and Jun Wang, a professor of chemical and biochemical engineering at the University of Iowa, are on a senior review panel at NASA. The two sit on a panel of 13 scientists that evaluate 13 satellite missions. Iowa State explains that each scientist focuses on one primary mission and two other satellites secondarily. Scientists have to consider the cost benefits of the satellite’s mission as well as analyze the technical parts of the mission. Before starting to analyze the satellites during the spring of 2020, Hornbuckle spent 100 hours reviewing the process. “We’re representing all scientists who use NASA satellite data because we want to think about what is in the best interest of the scientific community,” Hornbuckle told ISU. “Should we continue with existing satellites or invest in new ones?”The scientist emphasized the importance of the satellite analysis. “We want people to know that NASA isn’t just about going to the moon and Mars,” Hornbuckle said. “It’s also about studying our home planet. Remote sensing satellites tell us about what’s happening on Earth so we can make wise decisions for the future.”

Academic professionals at the University of Iowa and Iowa State University are assisting NASA in deciding what satellites should stay in orbit.

According to Iowa State University, Brian Hornbuckle, a professor of agronomy at ISU, and Jun Wang, a professor of chemical and biochemical engineering at the University of Iowa, are on a senior review panel at NASA.

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The two sit on a panel of 13 scientists that evaluate 13 satellite missions. Iowa State explains that each scientist focuses on one primary mission and two other satellites secondarily. Scientists have to consider the cost benefits of the satellite’s mission as well as analyze the technical parts of the mission.

Before starting to analyze the satellites during the spring of 2020, Hornbuckle spent 100 hours reviewing the process.

“We’re representing all scientists who use NASA satellite data because we want to think about what is in the best interest of the scientific community,” Hornbuckle told ISU. “Should we continue with existing satellites or invest in new ones?”

The scientist emphasized the importance of the satellite analysis.

“We want people to know that NASA isn’t just about going to the moon and Mars,” Hornbuckle said. “It’s also about studying our home planet. Remote sensing satellites tell us about what’s happening on Earth so we can make wise decisions for the future.”

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